Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Cake’ Category

Sachertorte

Sachertorte

Let me introduce you to a classic Austrian cake – Sachertorte. This is a cake sure to satisfy any chocolate craving you may be suffering from. And when it comes to Austrian specialties, who else to go to for advice, other that the Austrian born Wolfgang Puck. Wolfgang’s original recipe called for apricot brandy which of course sounds perfect for this wonderful cake but was nowhere to be found in my stash of booze, so I ended up using Grand Marnier instead which I thought turned out to be a really good substitute. Also, I made one tiny little mistake. Wolfgang tells you to cut the cake into three layers, which I overlooked, and so I only cut my cake into two layers. It still turned out fantastic, but I only got to use 1/2 the amount of apricot jam called for. Next time I make this delicious cake, I will make sure that my cake gets cut into three layers so I can use up all that heavenly apricot jam. Or come to think of it, I could have used the remaining jam on top of the cake, chilled it, and then poured the chocolate glaze over it. That would have been great too. 😀

Sachertorte3

Cake batter: melt chocolate, beat eggs, add chocolate to eggs, beat meringue, add flour to chocolate mixture, fold in flour, add meringue to chocolate, fold in meringue, finished batter.

Sachertorte: in 1832 Prince Wenzel von Metternich were having important guests for dinner and tasked his personal chef with creating a special dessert for the event. But it just so happened, that the chef fell sick that day and the daunting task fell on his 16 year old apprentice Franz Sacher. His dessert was very pleasing to Metternich’s guests but did not actually become famous until Franz Sacher’s son Eduard Sacher developed his father’s recipe into it’s current form. Since then, the Sachertorte has become one of Austria’s most famous specialties.

Sachertorte

Sachertorte

Sachertorte (yields 8-10 servings)

Ingredients

Cake:

6 oz. bittersweet chocolate (170 grams)

3 oz. butter (85 grams)

4 egg yolks

1 oz. sugar, plus 3 oz. sugar (28 grams, plus 85 grams)

5 egg whites

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/3 cup flour, sifted (45 grams)

Apricot filling:

1 cup apricot jam (280 grams)

2 teaspoons Grand Marnier (optional)

Chocolate Glaze:

6 oz. bittersweet chocolate (170 grams)

1 oz. butter (28 grams)

2 oz. heavy cream (59 milliliter)

Serve with:

whipped cream

Directions
To make the cake:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (176 degrees C). Butter and flour a 9 x 2-inch cake pan (23 cm x 5 cm), bang out excess flour and set aside.Cut chocolate into small pieces. In a bowl, combine chopped chocolate and butter, melt over a hot water bath. Set aside to cool slightly.
In a bowl using a wire whisk, whip the egg yolks with 1 ounce sugar (28 grams) until thick and pale yellow. While pouring in a thin stream, beat in the chocolate mixture until combined.

In another bowl, beat the egg whites and salt until soft peaks. Slowly add the remaining 3 ounces of sugar (85 grams) and continue to beat until shiny stiff peaks. Fold the sifted flour into the chocolate mixture until combined and then fold in 1/3 of the egg whites into the chocolate mixture to lighten it. Fold in the remaining egg whites, gently but thoroughly. Pour into prepared cake pan.

Bake for 40 minutes or until done. To check for doneness, insert a toothpick into the center of cake, it should come out dry. Remove cake from the oven and cool on a rack.

To make the apricot filling:

Puree the apricot jam and stir in the Grand Marnier (optional).

Slice the cake horizontally into 3 equal layers. Spread half of the apricot filling on the bottom layer. Top with a second layer of cake. Spread the remaining apricot filling and top with the third layer of cake. Chill for at least 30 minutes.

To make the chocolate glaze:

In a bowl, combine the chopped chocolate and butter, melt over a hot water bath. In a small saucepan, bring the heavy cream to a boil. Stir the hot cream into the melted chocolate. Cool until it reaches a glazing consistency. Spread over and around the cake. Chill for another 30 minutes before serving. Serve cake slices with whipped cream on the side. Enjoy!

Source: adapted from Wolfgang Puck

Print Friendly and PDF

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Blackberry Bars

Blackberry Bars

Blackberry Bars

Growing up back home in Denmark my father always had an elaborate garden with berry bushes, fruit trees, a vegetable garden and a green house. Needless to say he has always had a very green thumb. As for myself, I do well with herbs and I have tried my hand at growing tomatoes which turned out pretty good and this summer my blackberry bush actually gave me beautiful, juicy berries. The bush didn’t quite give me enough berries for these delicious Blackberry bars but it did give me about half of the amount I needed. I have to say, that there is something very satisfying about being able to use produce that you have grown yourself.

Blackberry bars

Cut butter into dry ingredients, pulse until only small pieces of butter remain and mixture is crumbly.

As for these gorgeous little bars they are a wonderful summer treat. I think they taste best when chilled and then cut up and served. The cake itself is soft, yet firm, a little sweet with a great crumb on top and the berries give a nice tartness to the cake.

Blackberry bars 2

Baked crust, topped with berries and filling, topped with crumble mixture and baked until golden.

Blackberry Bars (makes 16 bars)

Ingredients for crust and topping:

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (190 grams or 6.7 ounces)

3/4 cup sugar (160 grams or 5.6 ounces)

pinch of salt

zest of 1/2 lemon

3/4 cup unsalted butter, cold (12 tablespoons or 170 grams or 6.0 ounces)

Ingredients for filling:

2 large eggs

1 cup sugar (205 grams or 7.2 ounces)

1/2 cup plain greek yogurt or sour cream (135 grams or 4.8 ounces)

6 tablespoons all-purpose flour (52 grams)

pinch of salt

juice of 1/2 lemon

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

16 ounces fresh blackberries (453 grams), if using frozen berries thaw and drain of excess juices

Directions:

Line a 9 x 9 inch (22 x 22 cm) pan with foil and spray lightly with baking spray. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (176 degrees C).

In the bowl of a food processor or electrical mixer, combine flour, sugar, salt and lemon zest. Give a quick stir to combine. Cut cold butter into 1/2 inch slices (1.3 cm), add to dry ingredients and pulse/mix until only small pieces of butter remain and the mixture is crumbly. Reserve 3/4 cup of mixture for topping the bars. Add the remaining mixture to prepared pan and gently press to form and even layer of crust at the bottom of the pan. Bake 12-15 minutes or until light golden. Let crust cool for 15 minutes before proceeding.

In a medium bowl combine eggs, sugar, yogurt (or sour cream), flour, salt, lemon juice and vanilla extract. Beat until smooth. Gently fold in the blackberries. Pour filling over baked crust and spread evenly. Sprinkle evenly with remaining 3/4 cup topping mixture. Bake for approximately 45 minutes or until the filling is set and the top is starting to brown a little. Let cool completely on a wire rack at room temperature. Chill in refrigerator before cutting into bars. Enjoy!

Source: Annie’s Eats via The Pastry Queen

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Othellolagkage

Othellolagkage

The Othellolagkage is named after Shakespeare’s great tragedy Othello which was written in the early 1600’s. Lagkager or Layered cakes are very popular in Denmark and the Othellolagkage is the “creme de la creme” of layered cakes, a true Danish classic.

Othello

Draw circle, baked Makronbund, Cake cream, Layering cakes

The cake is served on special occasions but it can be quite expensive if bought at the bakery in Denmark. Of course you can make it at home although it is a little time consuming, but well worth your effort. To save some time you can buy the lagkagebunde (cakes for layered cake) at any store in Denmark or if you live overseas, they can be purchased online. However, I choose to make my own lagkagebunde which I had frozen and so all I had to do was pull them out of the freezer to thaw.

Roll & trim Marzipan, smear cake cream along edge, gently apply Marzipan to edge, decorate seam with whipped cream

Roll & trim Marzipan, smear cake cream along edge, gently apply Marzipan to edge, decorate seam with whipped cream

Ingredients for Othellolagkage:

2 lagkagebunde (cakes for layered cake, see link for recipe)

1 makronbund (macaroon cake layer, recipe follows)

Lagkagecreme (cake cream, recipe follows)

Kakaoglasur (cocoa glaze, recipe follows)

MarcipanovertrĂŚk (marzipan coating, recipe follows)

6 tablespoons strawberry jam (optional)

6 oz heavy whipping creme

Ingredients for Makronbund – Macaroon cake layer: (makes 1)

200 gram marzipan (7 oz.)

100 gram sugar (3 1/2 oz.)

3 egg whites

Directions:

Preheat oven to 200 degrees C (390 degrees F). Take a piece of parchment paper and trace a circle from the baking pan which you used for making the lagkagebunde, I used an 8 inch pan. Set parchment paper with circle aside.

Mix all ingredients together until you have a smooth homogeneous “dough”, this may take a good 5-10 minutes. Place mixture into a plastic bag, cut off corner and squeeze dough onto circle on parchment. Bake for 20 minutes and allow to cool completely before using.

Ingredients for Lagkagecreme – Cake creme:

1 egg

3 egg yolks

4 tablespoons sugar

1 vanilla bean

4 teaspoons flour

4 deciliter whole milk (13 oz.)

1 deciliter heavy whipping cream (4 oz.)

Directions:

Whip egg, egg yolks, sugar and seeds from vanilla bean until slightly thickened and airy. Add flour and beat. Add milk and beat. Pour egg mixture and empty vanilla beans into a cooking pot and over low heat slowly bring to a simmer while whisking continously. Allow to simmer for 2 minutes while whisking. Remove from heat and transfer into a dish, cover cake cream with plastic wrap and place in refrigerator to cool completely. Once cake cream is cooled, whip heavy whipping cream to a whipped cream and stir into cake cream. Continue to keep cool until ready to use.

Ingredients for MarcipanovertrĂŚk – Marzipan coating:

150 gram marzipan (5 1/2 oz.)

175 gram confectioners sugar (6 oz.)

50 gram glucose (1 3/4 oz.)

Directions:

Mix marzipan and glucose, adding confectioners sugar in increments. Mix until you have a smooth mixture. Sprinkle a generous amount of confectioners sugar onto your work surface and roll marzipan out to the height of the finished layered cake and the circumference of the cake, this is easily measured using a butcher’s twine or some other string. Make sure Marzipan does not stick to your work surface and trim edges with a sharp knife to get straight lines.

Ingredients for Kakaoglasur – Cocoa glaze:

200 gram confectioners sugar (7 oz.)

2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa

warm water

Directions:

Mix together confectioners sugar and cocoa. In very small increments add the warm water little by little until the consistency is thick but flowing easily. Set aside.

Assembling the cake:

Place the Macaroon cake layer (Makronbund) in the center of your serving dish. Place half of the Cake Cream (Lagkagecreme) on the Macaroon cake layer and spread to the edge. Place the first Cake layer (Lagkagebund) on top and spread a layer of strawberry jam (optional) and the remaining Cake Cream, leaving a couple of small spoonfuls as left-over. Place the second Cake layer on top of the cream. Using the left-over Cake Cream, apply a thin layer around the edges to give the Marzipan something to adhere to. Gently fold up the  Marzipan strip and then un-fold it around the edge of the cake, pressing it lightly against the edge to make it stick. If you have not already done so, mix up your Cocoa Glaze (Kakaoglasur) and spread it out over the top of the Cake layer leading the glaze to the Marzipan edge. Whip up the last 6 oz of heavy whipping cream, place in a pastry bag fitted with a star tip (or whichever is your favorite shape) and decorate the edge between the Cocoa glaze and Marzipan to cover up any gaps. Keep cake refrigerated until serving. Enjoy!

Othellolagkage

Othellolagkage

Source: Himmelske Kager

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Finnish Date Cake

First off, I would like to wish all of my readers a very Merry Christmas and Glædelig Jul. I hope your Christmas is filled with peace and joy 🙂 I feel a bit guilty that I am not posting something Danish here on my blog on Christmas Eve. I could have, but I chose not to because this Finnish cake is so spectacular and so deserving for a Christmas Eve post. So here is the Taatelikakku in all its glory, you wont regret it should you decide to try it out.

I am learning that the Finnish has a lot to offer when it comes to baked goods and this Date Cake is no exception. It is soft, moist and spongy with a delicate Date flavor and not overly sweet. The dough comes together easily in a cooking pot, so very few dirty dishes…I like that 🙂 The original recipe did call for a 4 cup bunt tin, which I don’t have. But I simply just used a standard 8 cup tin and filled it up half-way and it worked out just fine. I can’t say enough good things about this Date cake and it will definitely not be the last time that I make it, besides, I gotta make use of my cool-looking bunt tin.

Finnish Date Cake

Taatelikakku – Finnish Christmas Date Cake (serves 8-10)

Ingredients:

1/2 cup cold coffee

85 gram butter (3 oz.)

200 gram all-purpose flour (7 oz.)

1 teaspoon baking powder

130 gram dates (4.6 oz.)

90 milliliter water (3 oz.)

110 gram sugar (3.9 oz.)

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 egg

Directions:

Spray bunt tin with baking spray and set aside. Preheat oven to 170 degrees C (335 degrees F).

If you don’t already have coffee prepared, make coffee and set 1/2 cup aside to cool. Melt butter and set aside to cool. Sift flour and baking powder together, set aside. Break dates into small chunks and remove pits, place in a medium size saucepan. Cover dates with water and add sugar, heat until sugar has dissolved and dates are starting to soften. Remove from heat and cool for 5 minutes. Add baking soda to dates and stir. Add cold coffee and vanilla extract to date mixture. Add melted butter to dates and stir well. Then add the egg and stir to combine. Finally add the flour and stir until mixture is a smooth consistency. Pour batter into prepared bunt tin and bake for 30-35 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean, careful not to over-bake. Enjoy!

Finnish Date Cake

Source: Melanger

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Kringle

What is a Kringle? It is a Danish yeast cake which is traditionally baked in a pretzel shape. I guess that is why the portions of Kringle dough is so large because you would need a good amount to make it into the classic pretzel shape. However, it’s quite common for most people to shape them into a rectangle instead. The original recipe would have made 4 cakes which is too much for us here at home, although I could easily have followed that recipe and frozen the remainder down…they freeze well 🙂 But I decided to cut the recipe in half. It worked out very well and the only little hick-up I encountered was that instead of having an odd measurement of 1 1/2 large eggs ?? in the recipe, I went with an even 2 large eggs instead. The result was that I had to add a wee-bit more flour and the outcome was a very soft and pliable dough and an amazing crumb in the final cake. As with any yeast cake it is always best served same day it is baked.

The folding process for making Kringle

Just wanted to share with you that this particular recipe comes from a lady named Anne Margrethe who lives in Hirtshals, Denmark. Her Kringle recipe was featured on a Danish television show hosted by Søren Ryge and he declared it “Denmark’s best Kringle”. I must say that it is super delicious!

Starting top left picture: Cubed butter in liquid, Remonce, Filling on dough, Finished Kringler

Kringle (makes 2 Kringler, serves 12-16)

Ingredients:

For the dough:

1 deciliter water (3.4 fluid oz or 100 ml)

2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (or 25 grams cake/fresh yeast)

2 tablespoons sugar

2 large eggs, room temperature

a pinch of salt

150 grams salted butter, cut into small cubes, room temperature

325 grams all-purpose flour

For the Remonce:

115 grams butter

115 grams sugar

2 teaspoons cinnamon

Other fillings: optional

50 grams raisins

25 grams blanched almonds, chopped

Garnish:

1 egg, for egg wash

Pearl sugar (or regular sugar)

Directions:

To make dough: Using hot water, confirm that the water is between 100 to 110 degrees F (no more than 110 degrees). Pour warm water into a large bowl, add 1 tablespoon of the sugar and sprinkle yeast over water, let sit for 10 minutes. Add remaining sugar, eggs, a pinch of salt, butter and flour. Using your hands, mix all ingredients until dough comes together. Dough may feel a little tacky and there may still be small pieces of butter, that is OK. Transfer dough to a clean bowl, cover with a clean, dry tea-towel, place bowl in a warm location and let rise for 1 hour.

To make Remonce filling, place butter in a small saucepan and heat over low heat until almost all melted. Add sugar and cinnamon. Remove from stove and stir until all sugar is melted with the butter. Butter and sugar may be separating, that is OK as it will come back together as it cools. Allow to cool, place in refrigerator if needed. The end result should be like a thick paste.

Rolling out dough: For easy clean-up, place two long pieces of plastic wrap (cling wrap) onto your work surface. Sprinkle plastic wrap with flour and give the dough a quick soft kneading, sprinkle with a little more flour until dough is soft and elastic, and no longer sticky. Divide dough into two portions and form each piece of dough into a log. Working with one log at the time, roll out the log (on top of the plastic wrap) to approximately 30 x 15 centimeter rectangle (11.5 x 6 inches). Spread 1/2 the Remonce filling down the middle of each dough rectangle and sprinkle with raisins and almonds. Fold the ends over about 2 cm (almost 1 inch) then fold the outer 1/3 of dough over the middle and then the other outer 1/3 of dough over the middle again. Holding onto the plastic wrap, roll dough rectangle over so it’s now placed upside-down (seam side down). Carefully place dough rectangle onto baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Repeat process with second piece of dough. If planning on baking both Kringler at this time, allow both dough rectangles to rise for another 15 minutes on the baking sheet before baking.

Freezing: If you are planning on freezing the unbaked Kringle, wrap it up in parchment paper and then foil (or a large zip lock bag if you have one). When ready to bake, thaw in refrigerator for 24 hours, then place on parchment paper at room temperature for 1 hour before baking.

Baking: Preheat oven to 220 degrees C (425 degrees F). Lightly beat egg with a fork and brush dough with egg wash. Sprinkle with Pearl sugar and almonds. Bake for 12-14 minutes on middle rack in preheated oven. Allow to cool on baking sheet. Enjoy!

Source: adapted from Anne Magrethe i Hirtshals

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Double Chocolate Zucchini Cake

This cake was love at first sight and that love was confirmed with the first bite. I have always been indifferent to zucchini, didn’t pay them any attention. As a matter of fact I always thought they were a bit boring. So what initially drew me to this cake was the deep, dark chocolate look and then I read on and discovered it contained zucchini, and I was intrigued. I had to taste this for myself.

The result was amazing and the cake left me speechless…well almost speechless 🙂 The cake is moist with a delicious intense chocolate flavor and I still can’t believe that it has zucchini in it. I was a bit unsure when I first made this cake if I should simply just let the shredded zucchini sit in the sieve and drip off while I prepared the other ingredients. I seemed to me that it should at least get squeezed a little to get rid of some more liquid. But I decided to trust the instructions and just let it sit quietly and drip off and it turned out perfectly. As you can probably tell I am a little excited about this cake and it will definitely not be the last time that I make it.

Double Chocolate Zucchini Cake (makes 1 loaf)

Ingredients:

2 cups zucchini (1 large), shredded

1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon allspice

6 tablespoons butter (3 oz.), melted

1 large egg

3/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

3/4 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions:

Rinse and dry zucchini. Leaving the peel on, grate the zucchini using the small holes on the grater. Place shredded zucchini in a sieve over a bowl and allow the excess liquid to drain while you prepare the remaining ingredients.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter a loaf pan and set aside.

In a bowl sift together flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and allspice, set aside.

Over low heat melt butter and set aside to cool a little.

In your stand-mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or use a handheld mixer) beat egg and sugar until creamy and smooth. While continuing to mix, add vanilla extract and butter. Using a spatula, fold in the shredded zucchini. Then fold in the dry ingredients until combined, do this in three increments. Add chocolate chips and mix until combined. Pour into prepared loaf pan and bake for 50-55 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow to cool in pan. Enjoy!

Source: adapted from Sweet Pea’s Kitchen

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Karleksmum aka Love Yummie

This is a Swedish cake called Kärleksmums aka Love Yummies and I can totally see why it got the cute name. It’s also sometimes referred to as Snoddas or Mocha Squares…dear child has many names. This wonderful cake is light and fluffy with a mild, sweet cocoa flavor which goes perfectly with the coconut topping. When I first made Kärleksmums I had some doubt about the frosting. It appeared very grainy when I mixed it together but when I applied it to the warm cake it got completely smooth. The coconut I used is an unsweetened finely shredded coconut which I found in my local grocery stores Organic section. It is similar to what they always use in Europe so you can imagine my excitement when I stumbled onto it. If you decide to make this cake I know that you’ll love these little yummie pieces of cake.

Kärleksmums (15-18 servings)

Ingredients:

150 grams butter (5.3 oz. or 10 tablespoons)

2 eggs

300 ml sugar (10 ounces)

2 teaspoon vanilla sugar

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa, sifted

450 ml flour (9 oz.)

2 teaspoon baking soda

150 ml milk (5 oz.)

Frosting:

75 grams butter (2.5 oz. or 5 tablespoons)

2 teaspoon cold coffee

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa, sifted

2 teaspoon vanilla sugar

350 ml confectioners sugar (7 oz.)

Topping:

unsweetened shredded coconut

Directions:

Preheat oven to 175 degrees C (340 degrees F). Spray a 9 x 13 inch baking pan with baking spray and set aside.

Melt butter and set aside to cool. Beat eggs and sugar until pale yellow and thick. Add dry ingredients alternating with the milk and butter. Pour batter into baking pan and bake in the middle of oven for 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.

To make topping: Melt butter. Add coffee, cocoa, vanilla sugar and confectioners sugar and stir together. (Mixture may appear grainy at this point but it will smooth out once applied to cake). After the cake has cooled for 5 minutes, spread to topping out over the cake and sprinkle with a generous amount of coconut. Enjoy!

Karleksmums

Source: adapted from A Cat In The Kitchen

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Lagkagebunde

When it’s a special occasion like a Birthday or an Anniversary or perhaps company is just coming over for a visit, what do you make for dessert? Well in Denmark Lagkage would be a very typical choice. And in Denmark it doesn’t take too much planning either because if you don’t have the cakes for the Lagkage you could just run to the grocery store and pick up a couple. However, living across the ocean, Lagkagebunde (individual cakes for making layered cakes) is not readily available in the stores where I live. I could buy some online and throw them in the freezer for a rainy day or I could bake them myself. When I came across Himmelske Kager’s write-up on making your own Lagkagebunde I figured it was worth a try. She has a really nice tutorial and a lot of helpful tips, not to mention that her cake is delicious.

Draw an outline of pan and place cut-out inside.

It is important that you use the correct size pan and that you follow the instruction not to grease the sides of the pan. This way you’ll get a really nice outcome. The cake itself is really easy to make, but do make sure that your eggs are at room temperature.

Lagkagebunde (makes 1 cake, cut into 3 thin cake layers)

Ingredients:

5 eggs, at room temperature, separated into yolks and whites

120 gram sugar

100 gram all-purpose flour

15 gram cornstarch

1 teaspoon baking powder

Directions:

Using an 8 inch cake pan, butter the bottom of the pan only. Do not butter the sides of the pan as this will ensure the cake rising straight up. Trace a circle of the bottom of the pan onto parchment paper and cut the circle out. Place the parchment paper circle onto the greased bottom of pan and set the pan aside.

Preheat oven to 340 degrees F (175 degrees C)

Making sure eggs are at room temperature, separate into yolks and whites. Place the egg yolks into a bowl, add sugar and beat until it becomes a pale yellow, thick mixture.

In another clean bowl or stand-up mixer, beat the egg whites until stiff.

Sift the flour, cornstarch and baking powder into the egg yolk mixture, beat until it’s homogeneous. Add the stiff egg whites and gently fold into the egg yolk mixture. You do this by cutting down the middle of mixture with your spatula and folding it over the other half, rotating the bowl 1/4 turn each time, repeat until fully incorporated.

Pour batter into prepared cake pan and bake for 30-40 minutes. Do not open oven door the first 30 minutes. Careful not to over-bake the cake. It’s done when the cake feels firm to the touch or test by inserting a toothpick into the middle of the cake, the toothpick should come out clean.

Let the cake cool in the cake pan on a baking rack. Once cooled, run a small knife around the edges to loosen it from the pan and turn it out upside-down onto the baking rack. Make sure cake is completely cooled before cutting it into 3 cake layers. If you are not using the cake layers right away they can be frozen. Separate the three cakes with parchment paper and store in freezer safe bags.

Variations in taste:

Add 2-3 tablespoons of finely ground almonds to batter.

Replace 2 tablespoons flour with 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa. Add cocoa with dry ingredients.

Add 2 tablespoons coconut to batter.

Add orange zest to batter.

Cake will fall a little while cooling, turn out up-side-down onto cake rack.

Source: Himmelske Kager

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Drømmekage

This Danish Drømmekage is like a sweet dream indeed. The cake itself is soft and spongy and loaded with vanilla beans while the topping is thick and soft with a caramel, coconut flavor that lingers on your taste buds. Note that the cake is even more dreamy the following day.

Drømmekagen is not a cake that I grew up with although it’s been around since the 1960’s. The first time I tasted it was one year my parents were visiting me here in the States and my mother and I made it for the Danish Ladies dinner party. At the time the only kind of coconut I had access to was the sweetened large chunky kinda coconut, which turned out OK but not the way it was supposed to be. So not too long ago I came across this wonderful shredded, unsweetened coconut in the grocery store and I have been thinking about remaking the cake ever since. So here it is and I hope you enjoy it as much as we have.

Drømmekage (9-12 servings)

Ingredients:

For the dough:

75 gram butter (2.6 oz.)

1 deciliter milk (3.4 oz. or 1/2 cup)

125 gram all-purpose flour (4.4 oz.)

1 teaspoon baking powder

2 eggs, at room temperature

125 gram sugar (4.4 oz.)

1 vanilla bean, seeded

1/4 teaspoon salt

For the topping:

150 gram butter (5.3 oz.)

250 gram brown sugar (8.8 oz.)

1/2 deciliter milk (1.7 oz. or 1/4 cup)

200 gram shredded unsweetened coconut (7 oz.)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 195 degrees C (380 degrees F). Spray a 9 x 9 inch baking pan with baking spray. Add 1 tablespoon flour to pan, shake flour around pan to coat bottom and sides, discard excess flour, set pan aside.

In a small saucepan add butter and milk, warm over low heat until butter is melted, set aside.

Sift together flour and baking powder, set aside.

In a large mixing bowl add eggs and sugar, beat on high until mixture is pale yellow and very thick (5-10 minutes). Add vanilla beans and salt and beat until well incorporated. Add 1/2 of sifted flour mixture to eggs and, with a spatula, gently fold the flour into the eggs until smooth. Add 1/2 of butter mixture to eggs and gently fold in. Add remaining flour and then butter, folding it into the eggs. Pour dough into prepared pan and bake for 18-20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into middle of cake comes out clean.

While the cake is baking, prepare the topping. Add butter, brown sugar and milk to a saucepan. Melt while stirring occasionally, bring to a boil and then add coconut, simmer for 1 minute longer. Remove pan from heat.

As soon as the cake comes out of the oven, turn the oven temperature up to 210 degrees C (410 degrees F). Add tablespoons of filling to the top of the cake and smooth it out a little. (Do not pour all of filling onto cake all at one time). When oven has reached the new temperature, place cake back into oven and bake for another 4-5 minutes. Remove cake from oven and allow to cool in the pan on a baking rack. Enjoy!

Shredded Unsweetened Coconut

Source: adapted from Anarkistens Ægte Kogebog

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

Brunsviger

Brunsviger is a classic Danish coffee cake of sorts. It comes from Fyn (Funen) in Denmark, the island where Hans Christian Andersen was born. It is a soft yeast dough topped with a generous serving of butter and brown sugar. It’s traditionally served warm in the morning or with afternoon coffee or tea and it’s always best the same day it is made. If you have some left-over cake you can heat it up a little and it’s still delicious.

The challenge I had making this cake was that the pan size called for, was an odd size (16×20 inch) which I don’t have. So the first time I made this coffee cake I made it “free style” if you will, simply just forming it onto a baking sheet. But it resulted in a lot of the topping flowing off the cake and making a big mess in my oven. After a weeks time of pondering I gave it another shot and this time I decided to use my 9 x 13 inch pan which is not the “correct” size but it does have tall sides as oppose to the baking sheet, and I am happy to say that it worked out great. The topping stayed on top and really seeped into the cake. Make sure to make plenty of finger dimples in the cake because this is where the yummy stuff hangs out.  🙂

Brunsviger – 12 to 16 servings

Ingredients:

1 cup whole milk, warmed to 100-110 degrees F (37-43 degrees C)

4 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast (or 50 grams cake/fresh yeast)

6 tablespoons butter, melted

2 eggs

2 tablespoon sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

Topping:

3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar

1 cup butter

Directions:

Heat milk to to 100-110 degrees F (37-43 degrees C), sprinkle active dry yeast over milk, give a quick stir and let sit for 10 minutes. Meanwhile melt butter and set aside.

Pour milk mixture into the bowl of a stand-mixer. Add eggs, sugar, salt and melted butter, stir to combine. Using the dough hook start the mixer on medium-low speed and add the flour in small increments. Note: you may not need all the flour. Scrape down the sides of bowl with a rubber spatula as needed and continue to add the flour until dough is soft, elastic and slightly sticky. Grease a large bowl with a small amount of baking spray or vegetable oil, place dough in bowl, cover with a clean dry tea towel and let rise for 30 minutes.

Spray a 9 x 13 inch (23 x 33 cm) baking pan with baking spray and line with piece of parchment paper extending up to the edges of pan. Deflate the dough and pour into baking pan. If dough is a little too tacky cover your fingers in a light dusting of flour. Press dough evenly out into the corners of the baking pan. Cover pan with the tea towel and let rise for another 20 minutes.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

To make the Topping: Over low heat melt butter with the brown sugar. Stir frequently to ensure sugar is completely melted and butter in fully incorporated. Do not boil! Remove from heat and cool slightly.

Pour 2/3 of topping over dough and spread evenly. Press your fingers into the dough to make deep dimples. Pour the remaining 1/3 of topping over dough and bake for 25-30 minutes. Serve Brunsviger warm. Enjoy!

Source: adapted from The Scandinavian Cookbook

This recipe has been submitted to YeastSpotting, a wonderful site filled with recipes containing yeast.

Print Friendly and PDF

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: