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Rugbrød uden Surdej

Rugbrød uden Surdej

Making and maintaining a Sourdough starter can be really overwhelming and intimidating to a lot of people, so I have been on the lookout for an alternative, and here it is. No Sourdough starter needed! However, it does need yeast, but the only thing you have to be aware of when using active dry yeast, is that the liquid temperature must be between 100-110 degrees F. If the temperature is above 110 degrees, you’ll kill the yeast. Do you have one of those small meat thermometers? Good, use it to check the liquid temperature. If you have a digital thermometer, even better.

Making Rugbrød dough

Making Rugbrød dough

Now you need a warm spot to allow the dough to rise and in the summertime that may not be a problem, but your house may not be very warm during the winter. To solve this problem I usually use my oven. It’s a small enclosed space and if you turn on the oven to 200 degrees for 30 seconds and then shut the heat off, it will be enough heat to turn the oven into a little warm space for the dough. But remember I said seconds, not minutes, and make sure you turn the oven OFF.

Dough rising in bowl x 2 hours. Dough rising in bread pans x 30 plus minutes.

Dough rising in bowl x 2 hours. Dough rising in bread pans x 30 plus minutes.

As for the outcome of this bread, I was really pleased with it. The bread turned out moist and super delicious, yet you have the wonderful chew of the seeds. A great bread without the hassle of making and maintaining a Sourdough starter. What’s not to like.

Rugbrød Uden Surdej – Rye Bread Without Sourdough (makes 2 loafs)

Ingredients:

250 g cracked rye (8.8 oz)

750 g dark rye flour (26.5 oz)

325 g whole wheat flour (11.5 oz)

7 dl warm water (23.7 fluid oz)

7 g active dry yeast (2 1/2 teaspoons)

2 dl buttermilk (6.7 fluid oz)

2 tablespoon dark syrup

1 1/2 tablespoon sea salt

50 g sunflower seeds (1.8 oz)

50 g flax seeds (1.8 oz)

50 g sesame seeds (1.8 oz)

Directions:

Spray two bread pans with baking spray, set aside. I used a Danish size 13 x 4 x 4 inch (33 x 10 x 10 cm) and an American size 9 x 6 x 3 inch (22 x 15 x 7 cm).

Place cracked rye into a bowl and pour some boiling water over, enough to cover. Let sit for 25 minutes, then pour into a sieve and allow to drain for 5-10 minutes.

Take a small amount of the 7 dl warm water, maybe 2 dl or so (6 fluid oz), place into a small dish and make sure the temperature is between 100-110 degrees F (37-43 degrees C). Sprinkle active dry yeast over water, give a quick little stir and allow to sit for 10-15 minutes.

To a large mixing bowl, add remaining warm water, yeast/water mixture, buttermilk, dark syrup and sea salt. Using the dough hook start mixing on medium-low speed. Add sunflower, flax and sesame seeds. Add drained cracked rye. Then add whole wheat flour and dark rye flour in 1/3 increments, scraping down sides as you go along. Once flour is fully incorporated, increase mixer speed to medium-high and mix for 6 minutes.

Scrape down sides of bowl, cover with a clean, dry tea towel and place in a warm location to rise for 2 hours. Divide the dough equally between the two prepared bread pans (approx 3/4 full). Place back into warm location, cover with  tea towel and allow to rise to the rim of the bread pan, approx 30-50 minutes. Before baking, pierce the dough with a thin skewer 15-20 times. Brush top of dough with an oil/water mixture and bake in a 400 degrees F preheated oven for 1 hour 15 minutes. If your bread begins to brown too fast, place a loose piece of foil over pan and finish baking. After baking allow bread to cool to a slightly warm temperature. Place bread inside a plastic bag. The condensation inside the bag will help soften the hard outer crust. Once completely cooled, remove the bread from the moist bag, wipe the bag dry before placing the bread back into the bag. The bread is now ready for slicing or freezing. Enjoy!

Source: adapted from Klappeklappekage

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Hvedebrød aka Franskbrød

Hvedebrød aka Franskbrød

When my parents learned that I was going to move all the way to America, my mother gave me this wonderful baking book. This book has so many wonderful recipes in it and I have read the book from cover to cover many times. But imaging that in the past 27 years I have been living in this country, I have never actually baked a recipe from it…until today 🙂 The excuses as to why not, are many but the main one has always been conversions. Well by now I am finally comfortable with metric to US conversions and so I picked up this great book once again and decided that the time had finally arrived.

Lademanns Brødbagebog - a gift from my mother

Lademanns Brødbagebog – a gift from my mother

I wanted to pick something very familiar that I grew up with and Hvedebrød, aka Franskbrød as we called it, was always my favorite. I know that this bread is probably very outdated since today’s popular breads tend to be very healthy and loaded with seeds and different types of whole flour but this Franskbrød still holds a special spot in my heart ♥

Hvedebrød aka Franskbrød

Hvedebrød aka Franskbrød

Ingredients:

1/2 liter water (5 deciliter or 17 fluid ounces)

2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (or 25 gram cake/fresh yeast)

1 teaspoon sugar

2 teaspoon salt

750 gram all-purpose flour (25.5 ounces)

Directions:

Heat water to 100-110 degrees F (37-43 degrees C). Sprinkle active dry yeast over warm water and give a quick stir, let sit for 10 minutes. Pour water/yeast mixture into mixing bowl, add sugar and salt. With the mixer on medium-low add flour in small increments, you may end up holding back a little of the flour . Mix until dough starts to let go from the sides of the bowl. Place dough into a clean bowl sprinkled with a little flour and cover with a clean, dry tea-towel. Place in a warm location and let rise until double in size, approx 45-55 minutes.

Spray a 9 x 5 x 3 inch baking pan with baking spray and dust pan with flour, set aside. Sprinkle work surface with a little flour and give dough a quick knead to deflate. Shape dough into a log and place into prepared baking pan. Cover with tea-towel, place in a warm location and let rise for another 20 minutes.

Preheat oven to 390 degrees F (200 degrees C). Fill an oven-proof bowl with hot water and place in oven on the lowest rack.

If desired, once the dough has risen, cut slits into dough with razor blade or a very sharp knife. Brush top of dough with a little milk or water. Place dough on the middle rack in oven and bake for 35-40 minutes. Bread is always best when eaten fresh but is also very good 1 or 2 days old and toasted. Enjoy!

Source: Lademanns Brødbagebog

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